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Words on Wise Management

The Importance of Proper Preparation

Just as a good chef carefully prepares all aspects of a meal before plating each dish, successful HR professionals carefully map out every aspect of a task before executing it. In fact, HR professionals are probably some of the most well-prepared individuals in an organization—or at least they should be.

Exit Interviews: Better Late Than Never

Most of us are aware of the high cost of replacing team members when they decide to leave our organization. When an employee leaves, many organizations have a “going away” party or some sort of celebration. What exactly are we celebrating? Does a party mean we are glad to see the employee go? Perhaps it depends on the person’s contributions and relationships within the organization. Wouldn’t it make more sense to occasionally have a “glad you’re still here” celebration?

More Than a Hunch: Making Better Hiring Decisions

Recently, I overheard a conversation between two department managers in the hallway of a client organization:

Manager A: “I will not be in our staff meeting today because I have to interview a candidate for the vacancy in my department at 9:00 a.m. If she shows up on time and has no criminal record, I am going ask HR to process this candidate as a new hire.”

Manager B: “Do you expect this candidate to be qualified?”

Manager A: “I just need a body in that job. Qualified doesn’t matter today.”

Trust - Cornerstone for High Performance Culture

A CEO for a privately held telecommunications company just learned the results of a recent corporate culture survey. Only forty percent of her employees responded favorably in the category of “Employee Engagement.” She was disappointed and frustrated, recognizing the impact of high employee engagement on achieving operational excellence. The initiatives that she implemented within the past year to boost commitment had failed. She didn’t know what to do next.

Should You Be An HR Leader?

Whether you are a salesperson or a CFO, you should be thinking about the people in your organization. You may think, “I’m in sales, why should I care about the people in my organization?” or “I’m the CFO, numbers are my thing, not people,” but you are dead wrong. It’s part of your job to think about your organization and its employees.

Telecommuting: The Good, The Bad, and The Skeptics

A recent Gallup report found that people who work remotely are more engaged, enthusiastic, and committed to their work—but only if they work outside the office 20 percent of the time or less. The common thread between most telecommuting studies reviewed suggests that allowing workers to spend some, but not all, of their time outside of the office could be beneficial for everyone.

Handling Online Employer Reviews: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly

It happens. You perform a Google search for your organization and come across a poor online review by a former employee. Regardless of whether such public feedback is accurate, the issue of employer reviews has been growing more prominent for a number of years. Employer review sites like Glassdoor and Vault that allow current and former employees to criticize or praise a company through anonymous postings have become increasingly popular, with as many as 33 million Glassdoor users and more than 600,000 companies reviewed.

What the Trump Administration Means for the Labor and HR World

As HR and employee relations professionals, we all want a better understanding of how President Donald Trump views American workers. When it comes to worker issues, we have seen two sides of the new president.

Stance on employment issues

Low Turnover is Nothing to Brag About

When a company has high turnover, that indicates it has problems. The same can be said for low turnover. Think about it:

Why Employee Engagement Must be a Priority, Not an Option

When it comes to your workplace, do you know how many members of your team are truly engaged? On average, U.S. companies have an engagement level of 32%. Basically, one out of three of your team members is engaged. Studies suggest that disengaged employees cost the U.S. economy between $400 billion and $600 billion a year!

Levels of engagement

Let’s focus on three levels of employee engagement.

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