You are here

Brad Federman

It's a Small, Small World: Finding Common Ground

I was in the Middle East having a conversation with my main contact at one of my client organizations. My contact was Arab and dressed traditionally with a head covering, robe and spoke with an Arabic accent.  We were talking about the organization, priorities and his role among many things, and in the middle of that conversation he abruptly shifted the topic by saying, “I love Jeff Foxworthy.” 

Now, I chuckled at first and then I said, “You know Jeff Foxworthy?”

Rules, Rules and More Rules – Throw Them All Out!

Too many companies these days focus too much on procedures, minimum standards and compliance.  I’m not saying those things are not important, but over time they continue to grow and become a monster in and of themselves.

An American in the Middle East: Context is Everything

Things are not always as they seem. One core lesson as a leader, especially a leader in a global world, is that we must question and challenge our own thought process.  We must look for our own bias and we must begin to understand what someone may be trying to say from their point of view. 

Making Cultural Connections Through Chopsticks

Sometimes a symbolic nature of one action can have a huge impact. This is true in all cultures, but it rings even more true in certain cultures. There are what you call high context cultures and high content cultures. Most western cultures are high content cultures where what you see is what you get. Everything is out in the open and on the surface. You mean what you say and you say what you mean. It’s pretty straightforward and does not leave a lot up for interpretation.

Success Comes from Being Uncomfortable

In the last several years we have seen companies reduce the amount of training they offer. Employees have less time to explore ideas, to reflect and seems more often than not people are uncomfortable with their workloads, searching for comfort any which way they can.  Sometimes that just means digging in and working harder. In other cases, it is burying our head in the sand, ignoring and avoiding issues. But one of the things that has suffered in the last few years are people’s ability to learn. We can learn a great deal about learning from the life of a lobster.

Time to Get Rid of Excess Baggage

We see the world from our own eyes, perspective and point of view. It’s too easy to react. We read into other people’s comments and most of the time, see things that are not even there.  We all do it, no matter what race, religion or background we have, we all come to the table with our own biases and baggage. 

Time to Get Rid of Excess Baggage

We see the world from our own eyes, perspective and point of view. It’s too easy to react. We read into other people’s comments and most of the time, see things that are not even there.  We all do it, no matter what race, religion or background we have, we all come to the table with our own biases and baggage. 

Ariens stands by firings of Muslim workers

In this interview, Brad Federman discusses how to proactively schedule work with Muslim employees to schedule shifts so prayers don't disrupt production.

The Challenge of Organizational Change

Organizational change can be a challenge. Over 70% of organizational change efforts fail or fall short of their original goals, illustrating that change and change management are not only difficult and messy, but shed light on or create problems. In addition, change may hurt relationships within our organizations. Well, as it turns out, that may be wrong. Obviously, change is challenging. However, in a new study completed by Accenture compiled across 150 organizations from more than 850,000 people, some interesting results were found.

New Year’s Checklists for your Business

Every year is a new chance to start fresh. People make resolutions – to eat healthier, volunteer more, be more organized, go to the gym more, spend less money. Why not make some resolutions for your organization? January is a great time to review and resolve any outstanding issues to start off organized and to be ready to tackle the year.

Pages